#177 John 1:40-42 You Will Be Called Cephas

Amy:
Episode #177 John 1:40-42

Welcome

Amy:
Welcome to The Christgazing Podcast. We are so glad you are here! I’m Amy Burgin. Usually, I’m here with my daughter Joy, but she came back from church camp without her voice and a very sore throat.

Christgazing, kind of like stargazing, is the act of looking steadily and intently at Jesus. If you are anything like us, you desire to fix your eyes on Jesus amid the distractions and troubles of this world. This podcast makes room for us to do that. Amid a world of many words, we slow down here and make space for the God-breathed Words, the best words, the ones that rightly comfort, correct, and lead us. Each week, we read a portion of scripture several times and create stillness after each reading so we might also be still and know God more. We are in a series that takes us through the book of John.

Pour Out Your Heart to God

Amy:
Before we read, take time to share your heart with God. Maybe you have a list of questions for which you need answers—or a heart filled with grief, joy, desire, gratitude, anger, peace, or a mix of some of these things and more—whatever is on your mind, name it, and bring it to God in the next minute.

[Pause and pour out your heart to God]

What Does This Passage Say About God?

Amy:
As I read today’s passage, consider the question: What does this say about God?

John 1:40-42 Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, was one of the two who heard what John had said and who had followed Jesus. 41 The first thing Andrew did was to find his brother Simon and tell him, “We have found the Messiah” (that is, the Christ). 42 And he brought him to Jesus.

Jesus looked at him and said, “You are Simon son of John. You will be called Cephas” (which, when translated, is Peter).

Again?

John 1:40-42 Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, was one of the two who heard what John had said and who had followed Jesus. 41 The first thing Andrew did was to find his brother Simon and tell him, “We have found the Messiah” (that is, the Christ). 42 And he brought him to Jesus.

Jesus looked at him and said, “You are Simon son of John. You will be called Cephas” (which, when translated, is Peter).

Take the next few minutes to consider what this says about God.

[Pause and know]

What Does This Passage Say About People?

Amy:
As I read the passage again, consider the question, what does this say about people?

John 1:40-42 Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, was one of the two who heard what John had said and who had followed Jesus. 41 The first thing Andrew did was to find his brother Simon and tell him, “We have found the Messiah” (that is, the Christ). 42 And he brought him to Jesus.

Jesus looked at him and said, “You are Simon son of John. You will be called Cephas” (which, when translated, is Peter).

Take a minute to consider what this says about people.

[Pause and know]

Lord, What Would You Have Me Know Or Do Today?

Amy:
As I read for the last time, ask God, “Lord, what would you have me know or do today in response to this passage?” 

John 1:40-42 Andrew, Simon Peter’s brother, was one of the two who heard what John had said and who had followed Jesus. 41 The first thing Andrew did was to find his brother Simon and tell him, “We have found the Messiah” (that is, the Christ). 42 And he brought him to Jesus.

Jesus looked at him and said, “You are Simon son of John. You will be called Cephas” (which, when translated, is Peter).

Take a minute to ask God, “Lord, what would you have me know or do today?”

[Pause and listen]

Blessing

Amy:
Christgazer, the Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make his face shine upon you and be gracious to you; the Lord turn his face toward you and give you peace. And may you keep your face turned toward Jesus today and know him more.

One Response

Amy:
I knew Jesus changed Peter’s name from Simon to Peter, but I never realized Jesus gave Peter a heads-up about his new name the moment they met. 

When Jesus looks at us, he sees us in our entirety. When Simon Peter first met Jesus, he was an uneducated, ordinary fisherman (Acts 4:13). He was Simon. But Jesus saw so much more. He saw Peter, the man who would become a shepherd and pastor for the rest of his life. Jesus doesn’t see only our current lack of education, career, doubt, confusion, or sinful state. No, Jesus sees us separate from all of that. He doesn’t only see us in our present immature beginnings—he also sees us in our future mature faithfulness. He perceives a complete picture of us from our beginning to our forever.

It seems C.S. Lewis worked to see people in their entirety. In his book, The Weight of Glory, he wrote, “There are no ordinary people. You have never talked to a mere mortal . . . it is immortals whom we joke with, work with, marry, snub, and exploit – immortal horrors or everlasting splendors. This does not mean that we are to be perpetually solemn. We must play. But our merriment must be of that kind (and it is, in fact, the merriest kind) which exists between people who have, from the outset, taken each other seriously – no flippancy, no superiority, no presumption.”

I pray we have eyes like Jesus so we can see ourselves and each other the way he does. I see you. I’ll close by describing you with words paraphrased from Psalm 1:2-3, Jeremiah 17:8, and Isaiah 61:3.

You delight in the Word of God. You are a tree planted by streams of water. You are strong and sturdy, with roots that go deep. You need not and do not fear when the heat comes. Your leaves are always green and never wither. You yield fruit in season, even when there’s a drought. Whatever you do prospers. You are an oak of righteousness, planted by God to display his splendor. And my! How splendorous you are!

This is the Word of the Lord.

Closing

Amy:
You can find a transcript of this episode and all our episodes at amyburgin.com. We’ll be back next week to go Christgazing together. Until then, don’t forget, when you put your trust in Christyou are one in whom he dwells and delightsa dearly loved child of God. You are royalty in his strong and unshakeable kingdom. Though trouble abounds, Christ prevails, and so do you.

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